Doris Kearns Goodwin

Auditorium Speaker Series
Date: Saturday, June 23, 2018 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Doris Kearns Goodwin

Doris Kearns Goodwin

World-renowned presidential historian, public speaker, and Pulitzer Prize-winning author for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II, Doris Kearns Goodwin is the author of six critically acclaimed books, including her most recent, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism, a dynamic historical portrayal of the first decade during the Progressive era, a tumultuous time as the nation was becoming unseamed and reform was in the air.  Film and television rights have been acquired by Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks Studios for the book, making this her second juncture with Spielberg, as they worked together on Lincoln, based in part on Goodwin’s award-winning book, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, winner of the Lincoln Prize and the inaugural Book Prize for American History.

In Goodwin’s new book, Leadership: In Turbulent Times, available Fall 2018, she draws upon four of the presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they first recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized by others as leaders.

At the age of 24, Goodwin became a White House Fellow and served as an assistant to President Lyndon Johnson during his last year in the White House. She later worked with him in the preparation of his memoirs. Goodwin became a professor at her alma mater, Harvard University where she taught Government, which included a course on the American Presidency.  As a young senator, former President Barack Obama, after reading Goodwin’s Wait till Next Year: Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, telephoned her out of the blue requesting to meet to discuss the book—and a friendship was established. During his Presidency, Mr. Obama occasionally invited her, and a few other select presidential historians to the White House to discuss past presidents, their legacies, and on occasion to request counsel. He granted Goodwin an “exit interview” for Vanity Fair as he prepared to leave office that focused on what could be considered his own presidential legacy.

Goodwin can be found on the TV and lecture circuit providing political historical context.


Simon & Schuster